Treatment for Fibromyalgia Using Myofascial Release

1/1
- By

1.9k
Views

This Massage Technique May Decrease Pain With  Fibromyalgia

Confirmation signifying the exclusive pain of fibromyalgia may curtail mainly from the fascia has led to some interesting type of massage called myofascial release.

Fibromyalgia patients often say, “My muscles pain all over my body, all the time.” But as scientists work to comprehend the cause of fibromyalgia pain, they are looking less and less at the muscles and in its place focusing more on the fascia.

What Is Fascia?

You are familiar with white, transparent layer on the exterior of a chicken breast? That is the fascia. Pronounced FASH-ah, it is a thin but muscular tissue that wraps around every muscle in your body and the structures inside the muscles. It also environs other structures in your body, including organs, nerves and blood vessels. Fascia forms a body-wide system of connective tissue that is necessary for appropriate function.

Facial tissue can become injured, like muscles and it can become swollen and tender. Myofascial release practitioners say the fascia can form adhesions, which are places where it is bunched up and wedged on each other. These adhesions cause the fascia to drag on other structures, create pain and damage function.

Fascia in Fibromyalgia

A state called myofascial pain syndrome, in which facial limitations and trigger points trigger widespread pain, is extremely common in people with fibromyalgia. In fact, fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndrome are well thought-out to be risk factors for each other.

Portions of the healthcare community consider they are actually the same condition.

A review authored by Genera Lipton, MD, suggested that swelling and badly working fascia neighboring muscle cells were causing the all-over pain of fibromyalgia and may be due to a dysfunctional curative reaction. Dr. Lipton hypothesizes that problems with the fascia may direct to central sensitization, which is a input factor of the situation and involves the central nervous system becoming hyper-sensitive to pain. In her book, Figuring Out Fibromyalgia, she outlines her theory of how the fascia is chronically taut and how that leads to a surge of other symptoms.

What Is Myofascial Release?

Myofascial release, also called the “trigger point method,” is a massage technique in which the therapist uses mild, continued force on the problem areas to break down adhesions and smooth out the fascia.

Many studies show that breakdown of theses adhesions can decrease pain, better stance, reduced symptoms, increased variety of movement and improved value of life.

Myofascial Release and Fibromyalgia

We do not have enough research on myofascial release for fibromyalgia, but what we do have is shows potential.  A study out of Spain showed that 20 weeks of myofascial release enhanced sleep, pain, nervousness levels and worth of life in people with fibromyalgia for at least a month after the treatment finished. At the six-month mark, sleep quality was still higher but other improvements had tapered off, signifying a need for nonstop treatment.

A massage therapist's hands press on a client's back.

This Massage Technique May Decrease Pain With  Fibromyalgia

Confirmation signifying the exclusive pain of fibromyalgia may curtail mainly from the fascia has led to some interesting type of massage called myofascial release.

Fibromyalgia patients often say, “My muscles pain all over my body, all the time.” But as scientists work to comprehend the cause of fibromyalgia pain, they are looking less and less at the muscles and in its place focusing more on the fascia.

What Is Fascia?

You are familiar with white, transparent layer on the exterior of a chicken breast? That is the fascia. Pronounced FASH-ah, it is a thin but muscular tissue that wraps around every muscle in your body and the structures inside the muscles. It also environs other structures in your body, including organs, nerves and blood vessels. Fascia forms a body-wide system of connective tissue that is necessary for appropriate function.

Facial tissue can become injured, like muscles and it can become swollen and tender. Myofascial release practitioners say the fascia can form adhesions, which are places where it is bunched up and wedged on each other. These adhesions cause the fascia to drag on other structures, create pain and damage function.

Fascia in Fibromyalgia

A state called myofascial pain syndrome, in which facial limitations and trigger points trigger widespread pain, is extremely common in people with fibromyalgia. In fact, fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndrome are well thought-out to be risk factors for each other.

Portions of the healthcare community consider they are actually the same condition.

A review authored by Genera Lipton, MD, suggested that swelling and badly working fascia neighboring muscle cells were causing the all-over pain of fibromyalgia and may be due to a dysfunctional curative reaction. Dr. Lipton hypothesizes that problems with the fascia may direct to central sensitization, which is a input factor of the situation and involves the central nervous system becoming hyper-sensitive to pain. In her book, Figuring Out Fibromyalgia, she outlines her theory of how the fascia is chronically taut and how that leads to a surge of other symptoms.

What Is Myofascial Release?

Myofascial release, also called the “trigger point method,” is a massage technique in which the therapist uses mild, continued force on the problem areas to break down adhesions and smooth out the fascia.

Many studies show that breakdown of theses adhesions can decrease pain, better stance, reduced symptoms, increased variety of movement and improved value of life.

Myofascial Release and Fibromyalgia

We do not have enough research on myofascial release for fibromyalgia, but what we do have is shows potential.  A study out of Spain showed that 20 weeks of myofascial release enhanced sleep, pain, nervousness levels and worth of life in people with fibromyalgia for at least a month after the treatment finished. At the six-month mark, sleep quality was still higher but other improvements had tapered off, signifying a need for nonstop treatment.

Reviewed by : Dr. M Rana, MD MBBS, FUMDC

References:

Castro-Sanchez AM, et al. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: eCAM. 2011;2011:561753. Benefits of massage-myofascial release therapy on pain, anxiety, quality of sleep, depression, and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia.

Ceda D, Elvira L, Guzman JF, Pablos A. Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness. 2017 Jul-Aug;57(7-8):993-1002. doi: 10.23736/S0022-4707. Benefits of a self-myofascial release program on health-related quality of life in people with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

Kain J, et al. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. 2011 Jan;15(1):63-7. Comparison of an indirect tri-planar myofascial release (MFR) technique and a hot pack for increasing range of motion.

Liptan GL. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. 2010 Jan;14(1):3-12 Fascia: A missing link in our understanding of the pathology of fibromyalgia.

Meltzer KR, et al. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. 2010 Apr;14(2):162-71. In vitro modeling of repetitive motion injury and myofascial release.

Reference: Treatment for fibromyalgia from myofascial release from living-smarter-with-fibromyalgia

Leave Your Comment